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INCA Musical Night


The Embassy of Peru in South Africa hosted an Inca Musical Night on 23 March 2012 that H.E. Daul Matute, Ambassador of Peru, said will connect South Africa and Peru musically.


In welcoming guests to the event Ambassador Matute thanked the University of Pretoria for hosting the event and said that the links between the University and the Embassy of Peru are strong.  


He went on to say, "It’s not easy to present the culture, traditions and musical expressions of a country as rich and diverse as Peru in just one hour, but I’m sure that before this show ends you’ll all understand why every Peruvian in the world, it doesn’t matter where he comes from, where he lives or what he does, will be proud to say that he was born in Peru.


Tonight you will listen to beautiful and ancient melodies from the high lands of Peru, played by a very well known group, INCA SPIRIT, that travels the world sharing our heritage with different cultures.


As well, you will be able to admire two typical dances from the highlands: Huylas and Valicha, performed by kids trained by two professional Peruvian dancers.


And finally the Marinera Limeña, a dance that will take your breath away.


Enjoy the evening."


Inca Spirit, a Peruvian traditional music group headed by Edgar Canaza entertained the guests with their music. The magic of Andean panpipes was the flavour of their performance. The zampoña or pan pipe is an ancient musical instrument. The pan flute has long been popular as a folk instrument, and is considered the first mouth organ, ancestor of both the pipe organ and the harmonica. Most of the titles of their songs, and the lyrics are in Quechua. Quechua is a Native South American language and dialect cluster spoken primarily in the Andes of South America. It is the most widely spoken language family of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, with a total of around 10 million speakers. Today, Quechua has the status of an official language in Bolivia and Peru, along with Spanish.


They had the audience on their feet when they performed El Cóndor Pasa -"The condor goes by - a song from the zarzuela El Cóndor Pasa by the Peruvian composer Daniel Alomía Robles, written in 1913 and based on traditional Andean folk tunes. It is possibly the best-known Peruvian song worldwide due to a cover version by Simon & Garfunkel in 1970 on their Bridge Over Troubled Water album. This cover version is called "El Condor Pasa (If I Could)".



TUSUY SUMAQ LLACTA, (Beautiful people that dances) is the name of the group that performed two of the nicest Peruvians dances from our highlands: Valicha and Huaylas.


'Valicha' is a very popular 'huayno' song from the town of Cusco in Peru. The lyrics tell about a pretty girl named Valicha who is stealing the hearts of young men.


Huaylas is a very popular and full of energy  dance originally from the central highlands in Peru. Its origin comes from the ancient nocturnal beating of the grains right after the harvest, that's why the dance has a very strong tapping. The dancers imitate the movements they do in the field while sowing the potatoes, it must be executed with a lot of strength, ability and dexterity allowing a healthy competition among males. At the beginning it was a male dance, performed listening to the rhythm of their women, they did agriculture activities while dancing and by doing this they created this beautiful musical expression full of flirting and strength.



Katia Davis and Cesar Hurtado, both of them Peruvians living in South Africa, delighted the audience with the Marinera Limeña, which is usually called the National Dance of Peru. It is a graceful and romantic couple's dance that uses handkerchiefs as props. The dance is an elegant and stylish reenactment of a courtship, and it shows a blend of the different cultures of Peru. The dance itself has gained a lot of recognition and is one of the most popular traditional dances of Peru.

There are three different kind of marinera: Limeña (from Lima), Norteña (from the north) and Serrana (from the highlands).


Guests tastebuds were tantalized by Peruvian cuisine and pisco, the Peruvian national drink.



March 2018






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