The Diplomatic Society

 
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Indonesia Independence Day

7 September 2016

Ambassador Suprapto Martosetomo of the Republic of Indonesia hosted a reception to commemorate Indonesia's 71st Anniversary of Independence.

Introducing Indonesia to the guests Ambassador Martosetomo said that Indonesia is the largest archipelago and the 4th most populous country in the world, as well as the 3rd biggest democracy in the world. The archipelago has a total 17,508 islands of which 6,000 are inhabited. Indonesia stretches 5,150 km between the Australian and Asian continents and divides the Pacific and Indian Oceans at the Equator. As an archipelago, the majority of Indonesia’s territory is its seas and the vast maritime resources that come with it. With a maritime territory of 5.8 million km2, Indonesia has decided that developing its maritime economy is the way forward to bring prosperity to its people.

Photo: standing l-r: Mrs Ina Suprapto, Ambassador Matu Joyini, Deputy Director General at DIRCO and Ambassador Suprapto Martosetomo

Speaking about relations with South Africa Ambassador Martosetomo said, "Recently, in order to increase the flow of people-to-people contact between Indonesia and South Africa, the Government of Indonesia has taken the initiative to waive visa requirements for South African Passports holders to visit Indonesia. So far this initiative has paid dividends as the number of South Africans who are visiting Indonesia is increasing rapidly."

Speech by H. E. Suprapto Martosetomo Ambassador of the Republic of Indonesia

First and foremost, please allow me to extend to you my deepest gratitude and appreciation for taking the time to join us in this celebration of the 71st anniversary of the Independence of the Republic of Indonesia.

I would like to take this opportunity to share with you recent development of Indonesia at a glance. Indonesia is the largest archipelago and the 4th most populous country in the world, as well as the 3rd biggest democracy in the world. The archipelago has a total 17,508 islands of which 6,000 are inhabited. Indonesia stretches 5,150 km between the Australian and Asian continents and divides the Pacific and Indian Oceans at the Equator. As an archipelago, the majority of Indonesia’s territory is its seas and the vast maritime resources that come with it. With a maritime territory of 5.8 million km2, Indonesia has decided that developing its maritime economy is the way forward to bring prosperity to its people.

We are here today to mark the 71st commemoration of the Indonesian Independence. The independence of any country, including Indonesia, serves as a means to bring prosperity, justice and progress to its people. These goals serve as the base in which Indonesia today conducts its development. Indonesia has a set of national development planning paradigm that is geared towards transformation. Indonesia has and is in the process of transforming itself into a productive economy, cutting the red tape through the implementation of information and telecommunication technology, accelerating infrastructure development, and putting special emphasis on developing Indonesia’s border regions in order to strengthen national connectivity.

In the implementation of those programs has been the goal of the current Indonesian administration. Indonesia has its fair share of challenges, especially with the slowing down of the global economy that we are still experiencing. This has greatly affected Indonesia’s economy. However, Indonesia has shown that it can withstand those challenges and still put out commendable economic performance. For the 2011-2015 period, the Indonesian economy averages yearly growth of 5.68% while keeping the unemployment level at a manageable 6.18%. For the first two quarters of 2016, the Indonesian economy recorded a growth of 4.92% and 5.18% respectively. This economic growth far surpasses the average growth of the world’s economy and is one of the highest among the Asian countries.

At the international fora, the ASEAN Economy Community begins at the end of 2015, and Indonesia has become an integral part of that community. Indonesia also continues to pursue the peaceful resolution of international conflicts, getting actively involved through dialog and the application of international law.

Indonesia and South Africa have a long and close relationship dating back to the Asia-Africa Conference in Bandung in 1955, when Indonesia as the host nation invited the representative of the African National Congress (ANC) to participate in the Conference. Indonesia has always supported the struggle of the people of South Africa to end the apartheid. This support could be seen in the pages of the Diplomatic and Service Passports issued by the Government of Indonesia before 1994, which contain the clause “Not allowed to enter South Africa”.

The close and cordial relationship between Indonesia and South Africa is also reflected in the interaction of its leaders. Indonesian Leaders have made a number of visits to South Africa, beginning with President Soeharto in 1997, President Abdurrahman Wahid in 2000, President Megawati Soekarnoputri in 2002, Vice President Jusuf Kalla in 2005, and President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono in 2008. In return, South African Leaders have also made numerous visits to Indonesia, including President Nelson Mandela in 1994 and 1997, President Thabo Mbeki in 2005, Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka in 2006, and Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa in 2015.

Recently, in order to increase the flow of people-to-people contact between Indonesia and South Africa, the Government of Indonesia has taken the initiative to waive visa requirements for South African Passports holders to visit Indonesia. So far this initiative has paid dividends as the number of South Africans who are visiting Indonesia is increasing rapidly.

In terms of economy, South Africa is now Indonesia’s third-largest trading partner in Africa. While in the last two years the export-import figures between Indonesia and South Africa has been on the decline, the export-import figures between the two countries in the first semester of 2016 has shown an increase of 5.3%. Current statistical figures notwithstanding, both Indonesia and South Africa are undoubtedly key players in our own respective regions. Both countries are growing economic powerhouses with significant roles to play in the world’s economy. As such, joint effort to increase the scale of our economic cooperation is simply both inevitable and a necessity.      

Embassy of Indonesia in South Africa

 


 
 
 
 

_________________________________________________
_________________________________________________

Translater


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Strenghtening Maritime Cooperation for a Peaceful, Stable and Prosperous Indian Ocean 9 March 2017 President Jacob Zuma has returned to Pretoria after a successful State Visit to Indonesia, which... <|> Pygmy Intervention Project 13 March 2017 The Pygmy community of the Central African Republic became a focal point at a gala dinner recently held in Pretoria at Burgers Park hotel. The gala dinner... <|> France and South Africa cooperation Visit of French Secretary of State for Transport, Oceans and Fisheries: Minister Alain Vidalies 7 – 10 March 2017 During his visit in South Africa between 7... <|> 6th African Film Week in Athens 13 March 2017 The 6th African Film Week taking place in Greece, brings to the big screen charming images from the African Continent: Urban legends, exoticism from... <|> Easing travel regulations between South Africa and Kenya 3 May 2016 South Africa and Kenya have announced measures that will make travelling between the two countries easier. South African Home... <|> Early warning centre for South Africa and Nigeria 14 March 2017 South Africa and Nigeria have agreed to establish an early warning centre to help mitigate and monitor possible threats and violence... <|> Abron Band from Iran share peace with music at Tsarogaphoka Primary School by Kgomotso Kgoale 14 March 2017 Kgwebong Consulting, an Organisation Development company that is dedicated to the... <|> Arctic Council at 20: Making a Difference Regionally By Srimal Fernando, Global Editor, The Diplomatic Society  We all know the temperatures are rising in the Arctic twice as fast as the... <|> Marrying of two iconic World Heritage Sites: South Africa’s Robben Island and Mauritius’ Le Morne Cultural Landscape 20 March 2017 Robben Island World Heritage Site (RIWHS) and Le Morne... <|> Freedom Park pays tribute to Sweden 21 March 2017 Human Rights Day is a significant day to South Africans for remembering not only the 69 people, who were killed during the Sharpeville Massacre,... <|>
© copyright 2011-2017| The Diplomatic Society| All Rights Reserved.